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Lifeless Infant Revived by UConn Health Clinical Lab Staff

Latonya Robbs-Joseph and Juan Carlos Restrepo are credited with saving the life of an infant who had stopped breathing in the clinical lab Jan. 17. (Photo by Janine Gelineau)

Latonya Robbs-Joseph and Juan Carlos Restrepo are credited with saving the life of an infant who had stopped breathing in the clinical lab Jan. 17. (Photo by Janine Gelineau)

Quick action by UConn Health staff prevented a tragedy in the clinical lab last week.

A horrified woman burst out of a consultation room holding her one-month-old daughter, who had stopped breathing.

The closest person was clinical coordinator Latonya Robbs-Joseph, who took the infant and started CPR. Someone else called 7777, the internal emergency number.

“She was red, turning purple,” she says. “There was no response. She was limp.”

Laboratory assistant Juan Carlos Restrepo then gave it a try.

“The baby felt like a doll, with no movement, and she was changing color,” Restrepo says. “After I would say 20 to 30 seconds, the baby’s stomach releases as I compress, and then I start hearing the baby cooing. I pick up the baby, she’s looking at me, I’m looking at her, and her chest starts to move. As I look at the mother, the mother was shaking and crying, then I saw the biggest smile. And the baby then rested her head right on my chest after that. And that, well, that was a moment.”

Restrepo says after he handed the baby back to the grateful mother, he was overcome with emotion and had to step out into the hallway.

“It was a very moving experience,” Robbs-Joseph says. “I think it was that parental instinct. We’re both parents. People were like, ‘What did you think?’ I didn’t. Instinct just kicked in, and I was like, ‘God, please save this baby.’”

Both Robbs-Joseph and Restrepo are certified in infant CPR.

“All we want to do is serve, and that was one of those given moments where we put that to practice, 110 percent,” Restrepo says. “This is one of those moments that everybody just chipped in, everybody just did their part, and the willingness of everyone is what stood out. We saved a life, as a team.”

Robbs-Joseph says she hopes this story inspires others to be trained in infant CPR.

“It doesn’t hit you, but then when you think about it and you still can see that little baby in your hands, it’s like, ‘Thank God that I was there, thank God that I was trained, thank God we didn’t hesitate, and just kicked into mode,” she says.

Looking at Us: Alexis Crean, Human Resources

Alexis Crean brings a positive attitude to her role as HR organization and staff development specialist. (Photo by Janine Gelineau)

Alexis Crean brings versatility and a positive attitude to her role as HR organization and staff development specialist. (Photo by Janine Gelineau)

If you’ve attended an employee recognition event, employee orientation, or a professional development course, chances are you’ve met Alexis Crean, organization and staff development specialist in the UConn Health Department of Human Resources. And, chances are her role runs counter to your preconceived notions about HR. Alexis has been with UConn Health for 23 years, the last 19 in HR. She lives in East Hampton with her husband and two teen daughters.

Q: What are some of your responsibilities in UConn Health HR that perhaps historically are not associated with human resources in general?

I know that this might sound cliché but I really do believe that Human Resources is about what we can do to help the organization, and its people, become more successful. I have been the lucky recipient of working for some great individuals who have helped me shape my career and that is why I choose to give back every chance I get. I have found in my 23 years with the organization that one of the best ways to do that is to build strong relationships. It’s about having a one-on-one conversation with the new manager who isn’t getting the most out of her team, and then helping her to get more out of that team. It’s about helping employees understand their role in the future and why “our” organization values them. Yes, we all have to make sure that we are abiding by the rules and regulations but as an HR professional I always keep the person I am serving front and center, giving him or her the best I can offer.

Favorite movie:
“Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”

Favorite musician:
Mozart

Favorite place to visit:
I love going to NYC any chance I get

Famous person you’d most like to meet:
Coco Channel

Favorite delicacy:
Colombian Empanadas

Q: How do you make your unique role in HR your own?

My mom always told me, “Bien predica quien bien vive”—“Lead by example.” That’s why I always keep a look out for ways that we can show employees that Human Resources really does care and that it’s not just talk. So if I can make an employees’ experience that much the better by offering a meaningful recognition event, or providing compassion during a difficult time, I am your person. People often say, “I wish I had your job because it looks like so much fun,” and I respond, “Thanks so much for saying so, and know that it is done with much thoughtfulness and attention to detail,” because I enjoy giving back to a community that I respect so much.

Q: What is something about UConn Health HR that you think is generally misunderstood?

To employees, HR could be the person they see only when something goes wrong. Yes, we‘re there when someone gets fired, during exit interviews or disputes, so it’s easy to see why Human Resources is commonly misunderstood. In my experience, being an HR professional is a constant balancing act of being an employee advocate, maintaining compliance, and acting in the best interest of the organization, ensuring that employees get recognized and offering resources to assist in developing their work and life balance.

Q: What do you find most rewarding about your role?

I am especially proud of the gift I have of visual storytelling. From the age of 5 years old I have been telling stories through pictures. I never thought that my passion would transcend into my daily work. It is so rewarding for me to take people’s messages and create a presentation or a visual that inspires understanding, action and change.

Q: Anyone who’s worked with you knows you always bring such positive energy. How do you maintain that so consistently?

Thank you, that is very kind of you to say! I subscribe to the Positive Attitudinal Effect. Meaning, the greatest thing about attitude is that it is the one thing we all have the ability to control. It’s a choice. You could say that my positive attitude is my secret sauce. A positive attitude has a positive impact on my productivity, work quality, service, innovation, and the emotional bond I feel with my colleagues, customers and family. It’s what I am trying to teach my daughters to practice, every day.

Q: What’s something you like to do outside of work?

We love our community and proudly give back to it through our family charity, the Turkey Plunge, which has raised $166,000 over the last seven years for our local food bank. There is something very satisfying about bringing together people, have some fun and making a difference in people’s lives!

UConn Health Faculty on Best Doctors List

Hartford Magazine’s Best Doctors® list includes 58 UConn Health faculty members practicing in such areas as dermatology, geriatrics, surgery, orthopaedics, and obstetrics and gynecology. The list was drawn from the database of Best Doctors in America, an independent service that offers second opinions online.

Best Doctors physicians are selected by other doctors as part of a comprehensive review process. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as best in their fields.

UConn faculty cited:

Marc Paradis, Anesthesiology
Amir Tulchinsky, Anesthesiologybest-docs-2017-cover
Jason Ryan, Cardiovascular Disease
Peter Schulman, Cardiovascular Disease
Aseem Vashist, Cardiovascular Disease
Jane Grant-Kels, Dermatology and Pathology
Hanspaul Makkar, Dermatology and Pediatric Dermatology
Marti Rothe, Dermatology
Bruce Strober, Dermatology
James Whalen, Dermatology
Jeffrey Spiro, Ear, Nose, and Throat
Andrew Arnold, Endocrinology
Carl Malchoff, Endocrinology
Pamela Taxel, Endocrinology
Robert Cushman, Family Medicine
Patrick Coll, Geriatrics
Anne Kenny, Geriatrics
Margaret Rathier, Geriatrics
Gail Sullivan, Geriatrics and Internal Medicine
Craig Rodner, Hand Surgery
Rebecca Andrews, Internal Medicine
Elizabeth Appel, Internal Medicine
Lynn Kosowicz,
Internal Medicine
Thomas Manger, Internal Medicine
Jacqueline Nissen, Internal Medicine
Andre Kaplan, Nephrology
Claudio Adrian Benadiva, Obstetrics/Gynecology
Molly Brewer, Obstetrics/Gynecology
Winston Campbell, Obstetrics/Gynecology
Victor Fang, Obstetrics/Gynecology
Anthony Luciano, Obstetrics/Gynecology
John Nulsen, Obstetrics/Gynecology
Dave Park, Obstetrics/Gynecology
Garry Turner, Obstetrics/Gynecology
William Ehlers, Ophthalmology
Robert Arciero, Orthopaedic Surgery
Augustus Mazzocca, Orthopaedic Surgery
Kevin Shea, Orthopaedic Surgery
Seth Brown, Otolaryngology
Denis Lafreniere, Otolaryngology
Jeffrey Spiro, Otolaryngology
Naveed Hussain, Pediatric Specialist/Neonatal-Perinatal
David Steffens, Psychiatry
Andrew Winokur, Psychiatry
Nausherwan Burki, Pulmonology
Robert Dowsett, Radiation Oncology
David McFadden, Surgery and Surgical Oncology
Peter Albertsen, Urology
Carl Gjertson, Urology
James Menzoian, Vascular Surgery

Pediatrics Faculty at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center
Mary Wu Chang, Dermatology
Karen Rubin,
Endocrinology
Henry Feder, Infectious Diseases
Juan Salazar, Infectious Diseases
Edwin Leonard Zalneraitis, Neurology, General
Lawrence Zemel, Rheumatology
Brendan Campbell, Surgery and Thoracic Surgery
Richard Weiss, Surgery

Update: UConn HealthONE

The road to our electronic medical record system, HealthONE, continues full speed ahead. Roberta Luby, assistant vice president for HealthONE, says they’re more than halfway through the “building” phase of the project. They’ve started holding adoption sessions in which managers and key users review the dashboards that will help them manage patient care, quality measures, and financial results. Watch the video to learn how your feedback has played a critical role in the project’s success so far.

Engaging and Educating Patients While They Wait

The Pulmonary Department waiting room where a new TV monitor has been installed in partnership with AccentHealth, a healthcare media company that provides healthy living video programming. (Photo by Janine Gelineau)

The Pulmonary Department waiting room where a new TV monitor has been installed in partnership with AccentHealth, a healthcare media company that provides healthy living video programming. (Photo by Janine Gelineau)

If you have ever spent time in your doctor’s waiting room, you may have read some well-worn magazines or watched reality TV to pass the time. This is no longer the case at UConn Health.

Recently, new TV monitors were installed in many of the waiting rooms in the Outpatient Pavilion and the Cardiology, Pulmonary and Nephrology waiting rooms in the main building. In partnership with AccentHealth, a healthcare media company that provides a patient engagement solution for physician waiting and exam rooms, UConn Health patients are being educated and empowered to live healthy lives by receiving credible health information.

“The patients in our waiting rooms are watching a television network that provides exclusive programming produced by CNN and co-hosted by CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta and HLN Morning News Anchor Robin Meade. AccentHealth also delivers specialty networks that are produced in partnership with the American Cancer Society, Harvard Medical School, and the American Heart Association,” says Vice President of Ambulatory Services Anne Horbatuck. Segments include health news, living well, fitness, nutrition, medical breakthroughs, safety tips, and healthy recipes. In addition to the network programming, patients also view UConn Health produced videos and messaging.

“Patients used to sit down and either check their phones or read a magazine. Now they spend their time in the waiting room learning about health-related topics or getting wellness tips,” says practice manager Kelly Clarke. “The patient feedback has been so positive that we have increased the time the programming is available in our waiting room,” adds Clarke.

Bye-bye, Building 20

Building 20, constructed in 1990 for extra office space at UConn Health, in the process of being demolished. (Photo by Janine Gelineau)

Building 20, constructed in 1990 for extra office space at UConn Health, in the process of being demolished. (Photo by Janine Gelineau)

There are probably not too many of us mourning the demise of Building 20 – the small wood frame structure that was connected to the back of the main building where the police department is located. While it was drafty and dreary and had no running water (which meant no bathrooms!), it did serve a vital need for office space when it was first constructed in 1990.

Occupancy varied over the ensuing years, but typically served as academic and research-related support space. According to Thomas Trutter, AVP of campus planning, design and construction, “By removing this older, less than desirable structure, we are reducing long-term maintenance costs and the newly renovated space in the main building provides much more energy efficient and better configured office space.”

A pile of rubble is all that is left of Building 20 which housed research and academic office space for more than 25 years. (Photo by Janine Gelineau)

A pile of rubble is all that is left of Building 20 which housed research and academic office space for more than 25 years. (Photo by Janine Gelineau)

New Chief Counsel for Health

Brian White has been named Chief Counsel at UConn Health.

Brian White has been named Chief Counsel at UConn Health.

In January, Brian White will join UConn as chief counsel at UConn Health. In this role he will report to both Richard Orr, vice president and general counsel for the University of Connecticut, and Dr. Andrew Agwunobi, executive vice president for health affairs and CEO of UConn Health.

Currently Brian is associate general counsel for University of Wisconsin Health, a system with six hospitals and over 2,600 faculty physicians. Prior to UW Health, he was in-house counsel for University of Iowa Healthcare for nine years. He began his legal career with a private practice in Chicago after receiving both his JD and BA degrees from the University of Iowa where he continues to serve as adjunct faculty.

“The addition of Brian to the UConn Health leadership team comes at an important time for our organization,” says Dr. Agwunobi. “His experience in academic systems with transactions and physician relationships puts us in a stronger position to be an active part of a changing healthcare landscape across Connecticut.”

“Brian is an important addition to the legal team at UConn.  He represents another example of increased collaboration between UConn Health and the rest of the University,” says Orr. “ By enhancing  our in-house legal capacity we can reduce our dependence on outside law firms and improve service to internal clients at all of our campuses.”

“Joining an organization with the national reputation of UConn, at a time when they are so poised for success, is an opportunity I could not pass on,” says White. “I look forward to working with the exceptional team already established at UConn Health and furthering the tradition and vision of the academic medical system.”

Brian will be joined in Connecticut by his wife, Alicia, and their four children.

Creative Child Center Carolers

Tiny voices filled the air of the Outpatient Pavilion lobby Tuesday as 15 preschoolers from the Creative Child Center sang some holiday classics to family, staff and passersby. Video by Frank Barton.

Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health) Preschoolers from the Child Care Center perform their holiday concert in the Outpatient Pavilion (Janine Gelineau/UConn Health)

Photos by Janine Gelineau.

Last Call for 2016 HEP Compliance

A screenshot from the Health Enhancement Program online portal.

A screenshot from the Health Enhancement Program online portal.

Following is a message from Anne Horbatuck, vice president of ambulatory services, Anne Diamond, UConn John Dempsey Hospital chief executive officer, and Dr. Steven Lepowsky, UConn School of Dental Medicine senior associate dean for education and patient care:

Call for Your HEP Appointment Today

Now is the time to schedule all your preventive health visits and screenings required through the state Health Enhancement Program (HEP). The deadline to complete all your visits and screenings is Dec. 31.

UConn Health can schedule HEP appointments for all state employees and their dependents (if applicable). Appointments are available Monday through Friday at UConn Health locations throughout the state including Canton, East Hartford, Farmington, Putnam, Plainville, Simsbury, Southington, Storrs, and West Hartford. Here are the dedicated numbers to call:

All medical/preventive appointments: call 1.844.577.7055

For appointments at the Storrs office: 860.487.9200

For mammography appointments: 860.679.2784

  • UConn Health can help you fulfill all your HEP requirements including yearly physicals, cholesterol screening, vision screening (ophthalmology), mammography, women’s health, colon cancer screening, colonoscopy, blood draw, and more.
  • Calls are answered Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please feel free to leave a message after hours.

 For Dental cleaning appointments: call 860.679.3170

  • This applies to the necessary dental cleanings.
  • Calls are answered Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please feel free to leave a message after hours.

To make sure you are scheduling all required appointments for your age group, please log onto the HEP portal at www.CTHEP.com. If you prefer to access this information by phone, you can contact Care Management Solutions toll free at 877.687.1448.

 

Successful Surge Drill for ED

  • UConn Health employees participate in a surge drill in the emergency department at UConn John Dempsey Hospital Nov. 29, 2016.
UConn John Dempsey Hospital successfully conducted a realistic drill assessing its emergency preparedness and communications in the case of an external disaster, a Code Yellow, on Nov. 29. The 9 a.m. drill’s mock scenario tested the hospital’s response to a surge of 18 patients arriving to its Emergency Department after a multiple trauma bus accident occurred on I-84. The hospital’s emergency response was immediate with swift communication and activation of the Hospital Incident Command Center led by Nursing Director, Caryl Ryan. As Incident Commander, Ryan directed the team’s real-time response and communications of all personnel, hospital units, phone, and Everbridge System alerts via phone messages, emails and text alerts. UConn Health thanks the ED, Command Center, Fire Department and EMS, doctors, nurses and staff, including employees who played injured patients, for their drill participation and quick responsive actions in the role-play to help uncover any improvements necessary to put in place for a future, real-life situation.